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DIY Succulent Planters

DIY Succulent Planters

Succulents are making a massive comeback right now and if you are a little savvy, you too can have them round the home for next to nothing. Promise!

Most succulents are awesome as an indoor option for apartment dwellers and require very little in the way of maintenance. They are also very easy to propagate from cuttings- HELLO FREEBIES! I’ve noticed some plant stores really are cashing in on the fact they are popular again but you can avoid paying the steep prices if you are keen for a little DIY.

I always make an effort, when going for walks especially around different neighbours, to keep an eye out for any quirky looking succulents that I can break a small stem off to then grow at my home. You can group like plants together or arrange a few different types in the one planter. Next best thing, hit up a friend or family member who already has succulents growing successfully and grab some cuttings. Here’s a super easy (but I think very chic) way of displaying your succulent garden.

Grab a recycled, rinsed out tin can. Poke a few holes in the base of the can (for drainage) and fill it with potting mix. Grab your cutting (if it’s got a root attached even better. You can even propagate from a leaf) and place it directly in the soil after you’ve made an appropriate sized entry hole for it. Give it a watering and fill the top rim with some decorative stones.

Succulents can survive with very little water however that doesn’t mean you can neglect them! I tend to mine every fortnight or so and this can be as simple as popping them on a ledge/balcony/outdoors when there’s some rain about or just taking them to the sink for a drink under the tap. Each plant will differ slightly by simply feeling the soil (ie if it’s dry or damp) you’ll get a good idea of what’s going on. Troubleshooting: Over watering will turn the plant’s leaves yellow and they will rot off. Brown leaves are a sign of underwatering. They do like drier conditions (think catus in the desert) so frost prone areas tend not to be the best environment especially if left outside. I think you can’t go wrong having them as indoor “pets”

 

 

 

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